Episode 57: The God Of LinkedIn Video with Alex Sheridan 

This guy is a LinkedIn video master. It’s none other than Alex Sheridan. 

I love Alex’s videos as they’re super creative and engaging.

They stand out in a noisy feed so I was curious to find out how he does it.

He was happy to share with me…

  1. How he shoots so much content and keeps it captivating.

  2. How he edits his creative videos? 

  3. And the nuts and bolts of his content process.

Seriously, this stuff is enough to have you shooting your own videos in no time. 

If you’ve been meaning to get into video posts, or you want to create more creative videos – listen to Alex’s process. 

And remember

to follow Alex Sheridan on LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexbsheridan/

to follow ‘Mellonie Francis’ on LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/mellonie-francis

Transcript:

Mel Francis  
LinkedIn, is that the first platform you go out to start distributing videos? Or do you just go to all the platforms in your you know, when you start distributing? Because your earlier stage entrepreneur at that beginning of your career? Yeah. How do you go about, you know, that process of okay created this video? Do you put it everywhere?

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah. So in like, you know, mid late 2009, I think it was summer 2019. Instagram was a lot more like hotter than it is today. Today, it’s kind of like, it’s, I would say on its way down, if anything, but I got on Instagram first because of the position I thought it was in. And then it was kind of like Instagram, and then there was LinkedIn. And like, those are my two choices. I wasn’t doing long form video content at that point. So I looked at like Instagram, and I looked at LinkedIn, I started putting out some basic content, it was terrible content, looking back now, but just basic, like sales advice, leadership advice, graphics, quotes, that kind of stuff. And then I’d say probably like, you know, September, to September, October 2019, I didn’t make a decision because we’re going a full time job. And I was trying to balance personal things. I was a dad of two daughters. And so I was like, I only have so much time in my day. And I really want to get good at the platform that I’m on. I don’t want to try to spread myself too thin from the from day one. And so I was like, I should really pick one and go all in. And just My heart told me everything inside me told me like to hold LinkedIn. I think Instagrams like not I don’t know what the future is for Instagram. It just didn’t feel like it was long term. And there’s something about me that told me like LinkedIn is it, it’s a business platform, the community strong, like you really can build something on LinkedIn. And so basically, in late 2019, early 2020, I decided I’m going all in on LinkedIn. And I still post occasionally on Instagram, but my main strategy is gonna be based around LinkedIn. And and February 2020, I went my first customer with that strategy. Six months later, I’m putting in my two weeks notice and my corporate job. So it worked out, it worked out. 

 

Mel Francis  
Okay, got it. Got it. So right now, Bosco went to where your business is. Now you are putting out content on LinkedIn first, tik, Tok versus YouTube sports. You you distribute to all of those channels. Right? And I just was curious, understand? Yes. And is it the same video but is distributed across all those channels that the service you provide? Or do you change it up her channel? Or do you slightly make it shorter for YouTube shorts and different LinkedIn? 

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah, it’s a bit of both right. So like, I would say, 70% of my videos are the same videos across channels. Now, when I say that people are like, oh, cool, I can create one video, just post it anywhere I want to. And it’s like not necessarily right, you have to really understand the platforms that you’re going to be posting for. So best chance in 2023 of you popping off or going viral or having your videos performed on all platforms, is, of course, the way the algorithms are tailored, and the way the platforms are tailored, you would want to go short form vertical videos, right now on YouTube shorts, you got a minute or less as we’re, as we’re recording this now. Tic Tac you’ve got longer, of course, LinkedIn, we’ve got longer Instagram reels, you’ve got longer so but if you create a good short form, vertical video, because most people are on their cell phone, the smartphones now you’re you’re likely that that video will perform on multiple different platforms, if done right. And so 70% of our videos are all the same exact video number, we may tweak, small things, we may change a little bit of the copy. But for the most part, it’s all the same. And we’ve built that so we can create something off of social media, we could record content, whether it’s from podcast events, things of that nature, we repurpose them. Or it’s me just filming content, whether it’s my creative edutainment videos, or just one off batching batch recording content. We record the content offline and then we repurpose it or edit it post produce it. And then we’re able because of the style and the way that we do it, we’re able to pull it and get it to YouTube shorts, Instagram reels, Tik Tok LinkedIn, and it typically performs regardless of the platform. 

 

Mel Francis  
Okay, okay, so I want to go a bit more into that process of understanding. So how do you Let’s go back to the start like how do you come up with your ideation of what video content like for yourself? How do you come up with that? Do you sit there and like just things come to you during the night and you get up at 12 o’clock and go wow, that’s great idea and you. what’s your process of ideation

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah, content ideation. I mean, some some of it does come like you know, you’re in the middle of night you wake up with this idea you’re in the shower or you’re under drive, you know, to and from somewhere to a restaurant or whatever it is, but I would say that my process to break it down so it’s actionable for people listening is like I have my notes app, which is a Word document. You can use anything that you want, where you can get ideas, you need to be able to take content ideas, and jot them down in an organised place, and then at some point, you’re either going to, you’re either going to take those ideas and turn them into text post blog posts, long form Video, Short Form, video, edutainment videos, whatever you want to do with that idea or that topic, you can do but now you’ve got the substance you’ve got, I know what the message is going to be about. And if you’re wondering, like, what is the message about? How should I think about that? Where do I get those ideas? Well, that comes strictly that comes directly from my customers, and my prospects. So I’m constantly fielding questions. I’m reading my comment section. I’m wondering why someone shared a certain video, I’m wondering, when a prospect asked me that question on a zoom call today. Let me ask knowledge to answer the question. Let me ask you, what made you ask that question, or why were you curious about that? Right? Why did you decide to put this on your video and not that, and I’m getting all these days, I’m getting all this data and insights from my customers. And then that’s the idealist. That’s the topic list. And then I just take that and I say, Cool, how can we make some how can we make creative content that somewhat entertains or entertains or motivates or inspires or educates based on those topics that we know that they care about? 

 

Mel Francis  
Got it? So then you’ve got all these notes, then what happens? Like is it once a week that you stand in front of your brain but green background and like? Ross? Yeah, you start you know, shooting, shooting that with a you know, what kind of camera what kind of setting like what happens at once a week is it everyday is as you feel? 

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah. So we do a podcast episode once a week, which is typically on a Tuesday, and we’ll get a tonne of repurposed video clips from that will get you know, from one podcast episode, we’re getting, you know, 10 to 12 Micro short form clips, we’re getting a long form video, long form podcast episode, we’re getting a newsletter, and then a handful of LinkedIn text post, we maximise the crap out of one video, which is what everyone should be doing with their content, right. And so that’s typically on Tuesdays on Wednesdays, I reserve a couple hours for me to record content from scratch. So if I’m going to do that, then I’m going through that Notes app and I’m going what are the like the four to five or six, or seven or eight, whatever it is. juiciest topics that I feel like are most relevant to my customers that are on the top of their mind right now. And that could be explaining why video it could be explaining how to do video can be a combination of the two. And I’m pulling out my smartphone, and a lapel mic, I use the movo Wykes or the calm because you can use rode mics are great. And I’m simple. That’s the two pieces of technology I’m using that’s all you need in 2023 to make great video content, smartphone, mic. And now you can use a Yeti mic, you could use a you know a got a Logitech webcam that’s streaming this right now. I do have a DSLR. I’m just not a huge fan of like overcomplicating things. So that’s it. So podcast, and then I’m also on get I’m a guest on a lot of podcasts and shows and live events. So last week, I was on two podcasts, I was on a LinkedIn influencer Summit. And then now I’m on this. And so it’s like, I will chop up all this stuff and get great content from it as well. 

 

Mel Francis  
Right? So next is you do all this shirts, you’ve got to put it somewhere. So someone can pick it up from your team. Yes, and actually editing, right? So tell me about the organisation of all these different things that happened like that. Because that can become very difficult for a new team member if you want them to edit for you. So how do you organise your stuff? So a creator that you’re going to partner with? Ken? No. But here is all my stuff. And you know, and do you tell them? Like, here’s all my stuff? And here’s the best parts I want to do or just do everything here? Like, because you’ve got these bits that you’ve shot that are already in small? Yes. What about all that your podcasts and all the great moments of that? Do you dictate? Do you remember? Or do you just say up again?

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah, it’s a great question. I mean, for me, personally, I curate is what I would call it that I curate my own content still. So whether that’s me timestamping what clips I want, or whether it’s me actually just trimming them. I still like enjoy that process. It’s like a kid up on Christmas morning and I come down and I’m like, who I got this long form video, I get to like, pick and choose what clips make it and what was good and what wasn’t. And like I’m surprised by oh my gosh, I didn’t think I was gonna get 10 clips, I thought I was gonna get six, you know. And so, for me, the curation part I still enjoy and like doing myself and I’m able to do it myself. And I think if you’re watching or listening to this right now, the curation process is very, very important. So if you’re a lot of people, what they do is they like hand it off to an editor. And the editor is a good editor, but they’re not necessarily a good Video Curator or repurpose or so they could be and you could definitely train somebody like we’re training our social media managers now and content managers to be repurpose kings and queens so they know what they’re doing. They know how to take that clip and chop it up. I haven’t let go of that control yet, but I’m sure I will probably at some point soon. I also write my own copy too. But the process that it goes through is that if you’re editing our videos, or we’re working with a customer, we set up a very similar process unless they have something already established. We use Trello to organise all of our content. And so it’s very simple when a new editor comes in or working with a new customer or whatever it is we have a tutorial video that they watch. It’s four minutes explains the exact process step

 

Alex Sheridan  
I step up, it’s super simple, it’s very easy, user friendly, and they come in and there’s a raw video folder. And then they take a raw video clip importances ranked top to bottom. So they come up top, they pull the video, it’s in progress from in progress, they’re editing the video. Once it’s done, it goes to ready to review. Then once either me or the customer, whoever it is reviewed the video, it may go into revision if there’s something that change if not, it goes right into edited videos. And then from there, it’s scheduled videos and archived the content. And so that’s kind of the workflow process. Perfect

 

Mel Francis  
so so so you’re you’re really still watching a lot and making sure like the best part two picks up the next part is now editing and your videos are edited, super cool, super engaging. There’s lots going on in your videos that I really personally love. And that’s what really caught my eye. What and Mike, my question that I had written down as soon as you know, what type of editing time do you allow your editors? Like, do you say, you know, prescribe them like you know, you’ve got half a day, you know, for edit or you know what? What’s your expectation on that quality or you don’t care? As long as you know, something creative comes out. Like how do you manage?

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah. So our mindset is like, if you look at some of the highest performing video content is edutainment content to me. You’re educating and you’re also entertaining now, and I’m gonna get to your question I’m going to reverse for a second. When I first hit the scene and started making video content, I created a lot of edutainment videos, and I still do like today’s video right on Tik Tok and LinkedIn, it’s 35,000 views already and it’s doing really, really well. It’s just getting started. Now with that stuff, I’m acting, I may be rapping I’m doing a skit video, there’s something really creative that Alex is doing. Now. Well, I did that for a while. And then I realised like people would look at me and go, Yeah, that’s really cool. I love your videos. But man, I can’t do that. Like that’s not really my style, or I don’t feel like I could do acting or rapping or that kind of stuff. And I never wanted anyone to feel like they had to do that because they don’t. But we we sat down and we were like, how can we help people create edutainment without them having to do acting or rapping or anything crazy skip videos, any of that stuff. And what we decided is we came up with this new creative editing model or method called animated personalised videos, a PVS. I had my shout out to Marcus Sheridan, because he literally helped me name that that name. He’s like, You shouldn’t call it you should call it something, you should get a name for it. I was like, I don’t even know what it he’s like this. I’m like, Cool, I’m gonna steal that things. But um, so we started creating this style where it was like, if you told a story, we would use that editing to not just do captions and titles, but to bring that story to life and make it more entertaining or entertaining, therefore performing better in the feeds. And we start started with doing with my videos first and traded on Tik Tok and LinkedIn. And we saw major success. And I was like, man, almost at the point where I was like, Do I even need to do the skit videos anymore? But I still love doing them. So I do, but and then we started we’re doing it with customers. And it started working with customers. And so like, then we like really took the next level and continue to do it. But that was why we started doing the edutainment and the way we that we edit the videos. But to your point around time, how much time do I give them to edit? It’s typically like it could vary. It could be anywhere from five to eight plus hours to edit a video if it’s creative, right? Let’s say it’s a one minute, one and a half minute. It could be seven, eight hours easily if we’re doing in our APV style. 

 

Mel Francis  
Yeah, yeah, I was, I was thinking that, that you would have to give a fair bit of time with that much motion graphic. And yes, I mean, and it’s, and then it would maybe even undergo a check. And then further revision, do you get your editors revision days? Like for you know, what I mean, when we manage an agency, one thing I’ve always found, and I think this is something customers are not aware of is how difficult actually it is to manage a full editing team. I think you kind of, you know, got into it and tried to explain it, but most people wouldn’t want to do what it involves us, you know, with editors and making sure they’re really tight on that timeframe. And maybe when we’re talking, we’re sharing knowledge, but it is a lot of effort of okay, so it goes on one, it goes for review by someone before I’m guessing it goes to the client. And then you checking it giving feedback. That could be revisions again, the second time around from Yeah, and yes. So really, a video could take all the way up to sort of 20 hours before they’re not probably counting after a point it goes. But it’s a lot of it’s a lot of a lot of production there that you’re handling from subtitling to motion someone like you’re giving a lot more time for revision because you’ve got so much going on in from what I can see.

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah, I mean in, you know, that’s one of the reasons that we hire content managers and social media managers for our customers, like some customers are like, they’re cool with like, going in and looking at the revision, and you know, giving some feedback and that kind of stuff. And then there’s some customers, like we have a customer that we signed up three weeks ago, we’re literally we’re just going to do video, we’re filming videos with them once a month. And then we sit back, and we do all the copy all the content management, all the scheduling, all the editing, all that you know, and so it’s like, you either can spend more money and get more freedom and time back, or you spend less money, and you’ve got to do more of the stuff yourself. Yeah, so it just depends on your process. But yeah, I think, you know, like having a really tight system and process helps. And when it’s a new editor, or a new employee coming on, that doesn’t Norrish system, it takes a little bit of training and processes, and that’s why we have an operations lead that really helps kind of smooth that out. But once they get going, it’s a pretty smooth process, for the most part. 

 

Mel Francis  
Got it? So with, with your service, what does it like, include? Like, what are the sorts of you said, you know, a customer will come in? Is it all done for you service? Like, you get x amount of videos? Or, you know, is there all platforms included? Or is it you know, is it one service? Or is it like, you know, pick and choose where you want to be like, what’s the, you know, what’s the offering to the market. 

 

Alex Sheridan  
So that’s a simplified, it’s like, creative video editing is one service, right? So you could be a part time or full time video editor assigned to you almost like you’d have an employee, right? The nice thing is, I am me and my operations lead are managing or leading this person. So it’s not that we do all the payroll, we handle all the management stuff, we do the coaching sessions, you know, all the stuff that we do, we handle that. And so they can either go video editing, and or they could do content management. So we would hire a full time Content Manager, social media manager that would come in and do all of the content management, right copy for them, post the content, schedule it, archive, minutes to Trello accounts, all of that stuff they would do for them. So they could sign up for both of those, or they could sign up for one of those. Either one they sign up for whether it’s one or both, they get my strategy, consulting and coaching, we do recording sessions, there’s a lot of built in value, where it’s like, you’re not just signing up for video editing, you’re getting a partnership with it, right? Because some people are like, cool, I want videos, I wanna do video editing and content management. But then it’s like, what’s the strategy though, because if you don’t have the right strategy, it could take, you could go six months down the line, and not be seeing results. And then you’re back at square one, because the messaging was off, or you didn’t understand your customers well enough, or the you’re creating the right type of content for the right platform. 

 

Mel Francis  
Right, right. So they’ll get one hour or so with you every month to strategize and shoot the content. And then the rest is they’ve got a start. So you’re like kind of a between a offshore like you’re introducing them to talent. And that talent. I saw a lot of your team is in Philippines, which is super cool. Are you introducing them to talent there? Or it’s their choice if whatever they want to pay? Like you can also find them talent on ground, if that’s wherever their budget is, but most people would be understanding that Yeah. Go ahead. Yeah, there. I mean, it’s right.

 

Alex Sheridan  
In don’t get me wrong. There’s great editors all over the world. And there’s great content, people and producers all over the world. But, you know, for us, we are responsible for hiring and training and onboarding, the talent. So they come to us in this, we said, what do you need? What are you looking for? What are your goals? What are you trying to accomplish? And then we sit down with them build that strategy out, and then we assign the talent that we know can help them accomplish their goals. So it’s that for now, you know, does that change a year or two years from now? potentially good, right. But as you know, if you’re going in, you know, Australia, US or Canada or something like that, you’re gonna pay a lot more for an editor now, ideal situation for most companies, most companies, I’m like, Look, if you got the money and you’re a bigger company, could you build out a content production team, in your company where everyone’s in house? The thing is that a lot of companies are willing to shell out that kind of money for something like that. So it’s easy, and they’re like, I don’t even know what I would fucking search for, or source for. I don’t know how to train people. I don’t know how I lead. I don’t know what the manager you know. So a lot of times, it’s just like, way easier to go through a company like ours, because everything’s just laid out for you. You just got to kind of show up. 

 

Mel Francis  
Yeah, yeah, got it. I mean, I also have really enjoyed working with the Philippines being Australia. And you know, time zones are great. Oh, yeah, you’re right. They’re over here. So, you know, Australians love using Philippine stuff for a long time. We’ve, you know, yes, I think, I think they’re getting more exposed to us and they’ve got huge growth there. But for us, you know, it’s been there where our virtual assistants and you know, amazing, creative from Philippines come and I’ve almost got into just hiring Philippine just because they understand the culture. And then you know, you’ve only got two cultures like my Australian team and my Philippine team can, you know, just work alongside of each other, whichA lot of us, a lot of us do just because then you know exactly what to expect and what they’re Yeah, you know, what their mindset is what your mindset is. And so yeah, and I’ve seen a lot of successful businesses also in the USA, that compete within content creation who just have like, hundreds of Philippine staff supporting, you know, two or three us in the, 

 

Alex Sheridan  
the thing I’ll say about it, too, is like, you know, we you have the opportunity, like we don’t, you know, there’s some companies that like, treat him like, oh, you’re a freelancer, you’re not really part of the company. Like, I’m sure you’re the same, you’re the same way that I think about it, we just like, they’re part of our team, like they, we are changing their lives, we’re paying them, well, we’re giving them bonuses, we’re giving them pay time off like, we are really we’re introducing, looking at benefits now. Like, we are really trying to take care of people and change people’s lives. We’ve had we’ve had employees build houses because of our pay. We’ve had, you know, employees be able to take care of sick family members. Yeah, we’ve had employees be able to save up for new equipment and computers and all types of really cool stuff that they’ve been able to do. That’s an opportunity of working for our company. And so for me, like that’s, that’s really, really important. And I’m excited to watch the team grow and I know will grow in North America and other areas, too. And I’m excited for that. But right now, I’ve got a great team, and I’m going to be in the Philippines in four weeks. Yeah, we’re doing routing and everything. Yeah. 

 

Mel Francis  
Oh, that’s awesome. I’ve got plans to be in the Philippines, because I’m half based. Bali. Yeah, I’m half based in Bali, and half based. Yeah. So, you know, flying out to the Philippines is on the cards for me to say hi, and just get to know like, you know, the culture that as a leader, like you really want to embrace and understand what’s going on, as you you know, as you move into your business growth, the more you understand, maybe you can pick up talent on ground even that you didn’t expect, right? So that’s really cool that you’re, you’re going over there, you’re going over there. But yeah, I, I really appreciate you that that cost model because you can then bring a lot of value back to your small businesses, and they can actually get out there and do video content at scale. One thing I did find that I’ll share with you with when I’ve been working with Philippines, and for a long time, I’ve had them all on my phone. I’ve had them all my full staff, payrolls and whether they were sick or not just because that’s how our market works. And I didn’t go through any agency, I just saw I wanted to treat people equal. Just my not my pickup, there was that in Philippines, they the way that their market works, or anytime they’re picked up by any kind of talent or any kind of offshoring resources, they don’t actually pay them if they take any sort of leave, or if they’re consistently sick. And, and I kind of was like, well, well, I kind of don’t think that’s fair. And I wanted to be this really nice, you know, Boston person, and that went all well. But just like, the caution there is because they’re not used to that, right, there’s no you’re not met, you’re not really measuring the output all of a sudden, over time could, you know, could really drop because you’re not now KPI in the same way, as a business owner and as you. So, you know, if you don’t show up for four days, and there’s no videos being at some point, I think, you know, one two times now and then every two months, like people might not really, you know, yeah, whatever. But I noticed that, you know, when you come in and you try and change a culture, you try and introduce new rhythms without really giving a layout that, you know, the expectation is still the same, it doesn’t matter, you did this, but the expectation is still this output, you could all of a sudden, you know, really be unravelling, and introducing a new system or a way of thinking without really positioning. And so that was just my biggest one of my learnings is, you know, it’s great that you want to introduce our culture and how we do business and how we have trusted it. Especially Australians, we have a particular way that we’d like to do it. But you know, as small business owners, or anyone listening on and to you is, you know, just be really, I think that KPI that I still expect, you know, if you are cellaring someone and I still expect X amount of videos, or I still encourage X amount of copy, like, you can go take sick leave on your family and all that but you know, there’s otherwise there’s going to be like, if otherwise you can actually all of a sudden be very misaligned. Yes, yeah. I mean, at the other day, you’re running a business, right? 

 

Alex Sheridan  
So it’s like, you know, my message is always like, look, we’re gonna commit to you if you commit to us. Right? So like, you know, it’s, it’s, it’s an opportunity that you can take and run with, you can have flexible work times, you can have good pay your salary, you can have the bonus, you can have all the stuff that you want. But that means that’s a commitment. Right? We’re committing to you and you’ve got to commit to us. And so, yeah, I’m pretty serious about KPIs and performance. I mean, at the end of the day, Like, I always tell my team, I’m like, Look, it’s not even a me thing. It’s, if we don’t perform, nobody has a job at all. Like, we don’t have a company. So like it for us, it goes back to core values of your company, right for us, like customer success, obsession is a big one. So it’s like when you’re obsessed with customer success and employee success to like that is at the top of the food chain. And it’s not the only thing. Like there’s other values that we have. But that’s an important one. And so like, if someone doesn’t align, it’ll be a conversation, but then after that, they will want it won’t last very long. 

 

Mel Francis  
So now the final part is distribution of this video, we’ve talked all the way through. Now, you’re, you’re saying that, you know, you’re getting incredible views on videos, when you’re doing these really creative, I saw that, you know, the wrap with the AI, the AI one as well, where you’re going against the AI, I really, I really love that. And I can see how that can actually go and be viral. But in my viewpoint, in my experience, when and I don’t know if LinkedIn tricks are different if you move off a format, but carousels have been you know, dominating the scene on LinkedIn for a while, but I’ve always, you know, try and still put up video because I think it’s the one that builds the most trust and a lot of people did use Do you see that in terms of, you know, your, your video views? Because you’re consistently doing it that the algorithm is sometimes you know, not, not giving it, you know, the same, I guess, effect throughout the whole 12 months or 24 months? Like, are you always averaging the same? Or do you see the algorithm sort of updating to sometimes reduce video reach? Or what’s your understanding? 

 

Alex Sheridan 
Well, I think the big shift that happened with LinkedIn, in terms of video was maybe about a year ago, somewhere around that mark year, year and a half on I remember what it was, but they for a long time they were they were judging video views as it had to be three seconds as you probably remember how you had to view the video at least three seconds and that was PQ. And then it was judging text post on if it hit your feed regardless of if you stayed on it or not. So actually was measured incorrectly there was an imbalance because it was like why need three seconds to a video but a text can be me scrolling right by it not even giving it one second. All right. So for a while it was like it was the results were skewed. And then once they made the change. I personally did not notice a difference between a text post and a video post in terms of its reach. Now obviously I do a lot more videos. I’ve never done a carousel on LinkedIn. It’s just not it’s just like not my style. There’s nothing wrong with them. It’s just like not my style where I do mostly videos 80% videos. And for us it’s always worked well. I mean, I would say it’s the opposite effect because most people were for so long. We’re like, oh LinkedIn videos like I don’t think that gives me any real. I was like cool, y’all don’t do videos then and I just like kept building and building my brand and like in it pretty soon you’re one of the rare people that like actually is able to put out video content consistently. The other thing I would say is that like carousels is like yeah, they do look nice and stuff and they they definitely can perform on LinkedIn. But where else can you get that carousel? You know, it’s like it’s iguana. That’s right. That’s right. Exactly. It’s not going on Tik Tok. It’s not going on Instagram real there’s no one on YouTube shorts is like when our regular YouTube so it’s like Instagram is basically become reels. It’s like really transformed the past year, year and a half where it’s like not the traditional feed even anymore, right. And so it’s like repurpose it. That’s what I think video is the easiest content to repurpose, because I can take one video clip and I can make it into carousels. I can make it into audio a podcast a long form YouTube mini clips to post so I think from that standpoint, it’s always been an attractive feature for me to be able to take one piece of content and turn it into like basically an unlimited amount.

 

Mel Francis  
But are you getting the same like do you get leads as well like inbound leads from these other channels like are you see as you know, results are so and how we rank Tik Tok first shorts first Instagram like in terms of unlinked in terms of the leads from 

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah, I mean, I’ll be honest, like for us, it’s it’s LinkedIn and it’s Tik Tok. Like, those are our two primary channels, YouTube shorts, I just need to post more shorts. I just haven’t like gotten a good rhythm around it. We do long form video content. And that’s like good for building deep levels of trust, and I’m sure we’ve gotten customers from it. But LinkedIn is probably 70% of our lead flow and then tic TOCs about 20%. So like but you know video like today my video on tick tock, you know, is out is significantly outperforming my video on LinkedIn. And it’s the same video. Yeah, but that is not always the case. Right? It depends. And also more follow up 30 Almost 3000 followers on LinkedIn and about 9000 on Tik Tok. So the follower counts a little bit none of that matters a tonne nowadays, honestly. But yeah, yeah, the lead flow is heavier on on LinkedIn because I’ve been on there longer. I’ve got a much better brand or bigger brand there. But definitely we get leads and customers from Tiktok frequently. 

 

Mel Francis  
Yeah, okay. Okay. So the impressions you’re seeing is, is it sort of consistent? Or do you see the algorithm ever change every month or every three months and go, Ah, it’s all of a sudden, you know, same quality video, and I don’t see why but impressions have dropped in. And I picked back up like, do you see that? Do you see that trend? And all of a sudden, I see LinkedIn all of a sudden push and give this year, they were doing this thing for poll where they’ll give huge impressions. Last year, right? Yeah, remember that? That means they’re taking away from a particular format? You know, they’re, they’re actually and the rumour has it, the Rumour has it that the reason video impressions are still so controlled is because they know that if they do bring too much video impressions on, what will end up happening is they will enable too much cross promotion, like all the TIC tock videos will then push into here. So they’re actually the reason they do the carousel, I think push is like almost strategical for them, is because you can’t use it anywhere else. Like it’s, that’s that’s the rumour that I heard, because I do find, sometimes my videos will build do well, and recently, they’ve come back and done well, but sometimes they had been like, feeling like they almost penalised that format over say, if I send the same message in a carousel, they gave me way more impressions, because they’re just favouring that format at that moment in time, which could, which could change, and I don’t believe in playing for format, I think you should play for what you come across the best what you feel, you know that if you’re really great on video, and you’re like that special kind of person? Yeah, you should go play that strategy, not because the algorithm said so you know, if you’re not really comfortable, and you’re shy, and it’s not something you don’t come across, well, then yeah, sure. Maybe you should play carousel what takes place? Because you just can’t, you can’t you’re not confident you’re not there yet. And that’s, that’s okay. That’s your style. And you can do other things.

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah, I mean, my thoughts on the algorithm, like, I always feel like the algorithm is just people like, it’s people reacting to the content, and that it’s either going to distribute it out to more people, or it’s going to distribute to less people. And the algorithm has one goal is to keep people on the platform, because that’s how for most companies, that’s how they get more ad revenue. That’s how they get the more attention to be able to sell that attention to other places. That’s how they sell it products like, but I do hear what you’re saying. I think there’s periods in time where the algorithm is adjusted, right? There’s things that happen to the algorithm, it’s AI, it’s, there’s data scientists doing things, you know, so I think, you know, I’ve noticed not so much an algorithm thing, but just, I just think there’s ebbs and flows in your content, right? Like, there’s times when like, it’s hitting really good, and you’re on fire. And there’s times where you’re posting content, and you’re like, what is happening? Like, I can’t have one, one piece of content that like blows up, you know, it’s like, and so it’s like, I think there’s just natural ebbs and flows to as being a content creator. And I think that’s one of the reasons similar to entrepreneurship, I’m sure you would agree, yeah, that if you can’t stay, like, kind of ride at level, like, if you get so low, because you had a week or two, where it was like, Oh, my, my views are down this or down my leads that you know, and then people stop creating content, because, like, I’m just discouraged. And I want to just not work anymore. And I’ve just noticed, like, and I’ve been doing this for, you know, over three years now, very consistently talking about video. And it’s like, I’ve gone through my fair share of like, ups and downs, you know, I’ve had very high highs, and I’ve had very low ups, or I’m like, What the hell is going on with video, you know? And so I think for me, it’s like, you know, you got to go back to why you’re creating content in the first place, what’s the purpose and for me, it’s, it’s building trust with customers at a very deep level. It’s entertaining people, it’s giving them good information while having fun doing it. And it’s connecting me it’s building brand and connecting me to my dream customers. And so I think for me, personally, video is the best way to do it from that trust building standpoint, because they can visually see you and hear you and get a feel for your personality. But also, just because it scales, it just scales so much like we’re YouTube is a big focus for us this year, and it really wasn’t as much last year, so that we’re gonna have LinkedIn and Tik Tok and YouTube and it’s like, you know, any all the new platforms for the most part, even Elon Musk is talking about Twitter? Why don’t we get video in this? Right? And Mr. Beast has been chiming in with ideas. And Gary Vaynerchuk has been chiming in with ideas. And so I think LinkedIn has to step back and say, like, Look, we’re not trying to be tick tock, of course, right? Like we’re not trying to be tick tock or Instagram. And I think that’s great. They shouldn’t try to be that right. I kind of like how they still have text and carousels and some unique things that other platforms don’t have. But you also can’t deny what’s happening with consumer behaviour and consumption of content. And the reality is that video is just like dominating so many areas and platforms, and just on social media off social media, we now consume four times more video than we did, you know, just a couple of years ago, a few years ago. So it’s like, a lot of things are changing. And so like LinkedIn has got, I think, balanced this whole, like, how do we evolve and continue to continue to innovate, but also So stay true to who we are. And so it’ll be interesting to see you know how it plays out. But I definitely think that video is only going to become more more popular on LinkedIn. 

 

Mel Francis  
Yeah, absolutely. I there was something really funny that happened. I had a customer from b2c world or Instagram, but like, you know, 30 million followers on Instagram, andI want to do link, I want to do LinkedIn, I want to do LinkedIn. And I was like, okay, and then their product cost. Each thing was like, you know, like, $60, or something like that. And I’m like, when I LinkedIn ads gonna kill you, kill you. Oh, anyway, he’s never opened on LinkedIn. So I open it up to him, just to show him like, just to see on Sales Navigator if you know, his audience is even there or whatnot. And as soon as the feed comes up, it was so funny, but hilarious, because this looks like a newspaper. Like, what the hell is the people? Do people actually come on here? And scroll and do this shit like this? Because I don’t understand. Because all he’s saying is Instagram and beautiful things. And he goes, Yeah, this database people. Yeah, what the hell feeds curated, its feeds curated over Instagram, from what he likes, seeing all the shit he’s used to seeing, right? We’re in LinkedIn, they don’t know what he likes. So it’s like a, it’s just like, it was just looking at like, going, you mean, you go on here every day. Like, he’s like, this is like reading the AFR, or some shit. And I’m like, you know, it’s such a, it’s actually so funny. Because that’s like, Instagram meets LinkedIn. It’s almost like a funny thing that you, you know, you do funny things. Like, that’s exactly what I was thinking. I want to end with the future of video and AI, and how you see that playing out? I mean, I, I’ve seen, you know, I’ve seen your videos saying, you know, it’s not ready. Yeah, it’s, it’s happening. But some of the things that I want to know about these, okay, like, I know, like, someone can actually create a concept of a person and they can like, be talking to it. I’ve seen it happen. Recently, my team was like, Oh, can you go and shoot this, like, voiceover? And I was like, why don’t you go use I think, Delhi II or something, you know, Valley II or something? And try and, you know, do it. And they were like, No, you need to log in and do it and done it. And then I was like, I’ll just record it myself. So you know, there’s still a little bit of annoyance. So what is going to happen? Do you think with AI? And then what’s the future of video editors in that progression as AI comes in?

 

Alex Sheridan  
Yeah, I mean, AI is gonna disrupt video content, for sure. I think, you know, if you flash forward to the future, I don’t know how long this is, it could be a year could be five years, whatever it might be, you’re gonna be able to sit down or you’re gonna go stand up, whatever you want to do, you’re gonna be able to record yourself on video for a couple of minutes, audio visual, everything and input it into a software system, an AI programme system. And then what they’re going to be able to do from that is, you’re gonna be able to put any script you want in there. And it’s going to create a video that is based off of your sound, your audio, your voice, your personality, your hand gestures, potentially, and it’s going to be able to spit back out a video that is based off that script, and basically ready to post. And then AI is gonna be able to come in and edit that video, captions titles, like you’ll probably build a programme, it’s what style you want, get some templates, that kind of stuff. And so basically, if you think about it, you’re gonna be able to sit there and just literally input a script, and stand back and watch AI, create the actual video as you and then edit the entire video in the style that you want it. Now, of course, with that people like, Oh, crap, it’s gonna be like a lot of people out of jobs and that kind of stuff. And yes, it’s going to put some people out of jobs. But it’s going to force people to innovate and add skill sets and create other jobs that are going to be because they always like I heard the scene recently where it was like, the AI is not going to put you on a job. AI is not going to put you out of your job. Someone using AI is going to put you out of your job. And I think that’s really how you have to look at it, right? It’s like, it’s not like as a company or company. It’s like, well, if AI can do all this stuff. Now, what’s our advantage? You know, we got to look at the marketplace, like is there still a unique advantage? Like right now you can go on chat GPT or Jasper at these companies. And you can have aI right you will LinkedIn text post, right yet there’s still a lot of LinkedIn copywriters out there doing amazing work and getting paid a lot of money. Why is that? Because their copy is better. And it’s more personalised and it’s what that they’ve got a relationship with their customer. So can AI get to that point? At some point? Maybe maybe not. Right, but it’s definitely going to keep advancing. But there’s always a place for personalised and customised and stuff that’s just innovative and different and unique and next level, like there’s going to be these pockets of opportunities. But it’s definitely going to change the way we look at video and editing and for sure the whole industry is going to be disrupted. I think the whole content industry is going to be disrupted. But I think it’s going to create a lot of opportunities, and it’s going to force people like us To not get stuck in our old ways, because there’s going to be a lot of companies that just don’t evolve. They just don’t adjust, like, oh, I don’t think AI is ever going to be this. And we’re just going to always do it this way. And like, you know, as people said, with the internet, that’s what people said, when the internet, I’m not getting the.com I’m not doing this, I’m not doing email. And then everyone started doing it. And so I think, like, it’s our ability as entrepreneurs, and content creators to be able to innovate and adjust along the way, and still keep, you know, true to our personality, our values and who we want to become. 

 

Mel Francis  
Yeah, absolutely. I mean, chat gpt is really interesting. I was using it as soon as it came out. And then yesterday, I tried to use it, and it’s now all of a sudden been programmed to say, sorry, I can’t do that anymore. You can go to Kerala, and they can help you to design and I was like, wow, last week, you know, like, even if you said, like, you know, let me turn this video into a carousel. Can you do that? For me? Here’s the transcript, and it would. And now it’s like literally breaking up the text? Why would it go backwards? When it was like, so? You really can’t? Well? Yeah, 

 

Alex Sheridan  

I was gonna say there’s a lot of things that people don’t realise with AI is that there’s a lot of copywriting issues, right. So like, if AI is gonna edit your video, where are they getting all these elements from to use? Like, and can they do the stuff that we could do on our videos? Probably not for a while, but even if they could, where are they getting all these elements from? If AI is doing art for you, or a carousel, or whatever it is? Where are they getting all these elements? So I think there’s a lot of copywriting and legal issues that will come with this as well. Yeah. And I think it’s like, people get all hyped up about it. And I understand why, because it’s cool stuff. But at the same time, there’s things that we just don’t realise yet that are also going to prevent its growth as well, and create more pockets of opportunities for people that are crafting something from scratch. So again, I think it’s like, you know, use it as a tool. But understand that, like, there’s still going to be a human component to content. Like, even if you’re writing using Jasper or Chad GBT, you still got to have a human kind of inputting good information, and then looking at the outputs and determining if it like their storage is going to be that, alright, like, I can’t, for example, maybe, and this is, I never thought about this before. But this is maybe live streaming becomes that much more important and valuable. Because there’s so much AI video stuff out there people like I can’t even tell if it’s like somebody’s real or not, it might be a freaking robot. And so now live streaming becomes one of the most popular sources, or podcasting where people are having conversations. And you can really tell that that’s it and authenticity becomes at the forefront, because all the other people are trying to take cheat codes, and create AI content instead of doing their own content. And so again, you see how that creates these different layers and levels to things where it’s like, there’s not just one path, right? It’s not like it’s Oh, it it’s technology goes up and everything gets eliminated. It’s like it’s going to create other things and culture and society that I don’t think we unders quite understand yet. 

 

Mel Francis  
Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Like just a caution for people listening on that, you know, you thinking on chat GPT. Now I can, you know, go do it by myself. It’s such an ever changing platform, that you actually don’t have reliance that you can actually get. And the so as soon as it came out, I was thinking, oh my god, US marketing agencies like what? What’s going to happen to us because they can just hire internal person but unreliability, the weight changing. Like, you know, you just can’t make rash decisions on something that we don’t even know what it’s going to be priced out. We don’t know what how it’s going to evolve. Because it’s evolved so fast to say no to so many things in the last couple of weeks for me, but even my team restructure that I was looking at going, Oh, we can just move like this and move like that. I’m going to be having to pause that. And I think same with customers as they kind of go through this journey. It’s just, you know, it’s just not. It’s a free thing. And it’s not free forever. And we don’t know what it’s going to transform to. But I’ve had such an awesome time, Alex talking, especially that last part of talking about the future and how you see it. That’s been incredible. Really looking forward to staying connected in LinkedIn network and following your stuff. And yeah, I look forward to putting this out.

 

Alex Sheridan  
Thanks, Melanie. Appreciate me on the phone on the show. This was fun. 

 

Mel Francis  
Thank you. Take care. Thanks.

 

Mel Francis  
You’re listening to innovative minds.

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